These Are The Healthiest Nuts You Can Eat

These Are The Healthiest Nuts You Can Eat

We shouldn’t have favourites. All nuts are created equal. Although, it seems almonds are getting all the love lately? No? From almond milk to matcha-spiced almonds and almond butter (so gawwwd) to well, almonds, there’s heaps to lurve. Well, guess what: Lots of other nuts are good for you, too. High in protein, fibre, healthy fats and magnesium we’ve got a whole bunch of nuts that keep you satiated and build stronger bones and muscles. Here, 5 of the healthiest nuts you can eat, that aren’t almonds!

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Brazil Nuts

Brazil nuts are packed with selenium, a mineral involved in thyroid hormone production, which is crucial in antioxidant function for processes that protect against cancer. They’re also great for hair, skin and nail health and have been proven to assist blood cholesterol levels. We know, these are big-ass nuts. So we recommend eating two or three a day to get the health benefits -  don’t go stuffing 10 of them in your mouth like you would with almonds.

Per 30 g (approx. 10 brazil nuts): 187 calories, 19 g fat (4.5 g sat fat), 1 mg sodium, 3 g carbohydrates, 2 g fibre, 4 g protein, 26% RDI magnesium.

Cashews

Great news dairy-free folks, cashews are a great diary replacement. Their creamy texture make a delicious substitute for Parmesan when ground, and cashews also make a delicious milk when blended with some tepid water. Cashews also have more iron than any other nut, so with this being one of the most common nutrient deficiencies, more women should include them in their diet.

Per 30 g (approx. 15 cashews): 160 calories, 12 g fat (2 g sat fat), 9 g carbohydrates, 1 g sugar, 2 g fibre, 5 g protein, 20% of RDI magnesium.

Macadamia Nuts

These native Aussie nuggets are making their way up in the world, and it’s not hard to see why. Packed with nutrients, Macadamia nuts are high in thiamin (vitamin B1), manganese and copper. They’re also packed with healthy monounsaturated fat, the type you find in avocados and olive oil.

Per 30 g (approx. 15 macadamia nuts): 204 calories, 21 g fat (0 g sat fat), 1 mg sodium, 3.9 g carbohydrates, 1 g of sugar, 2 g fibre, 2.4 g protein, 9% RDI magnesium.

Walnuts

Need a snack to fill you up? Try walnuts! Walnuts may be high in calories and fat compared to other nuts, but it’s the healthy fat that your body needs, which helps you stay fuller for longer. Furthermore, walnuts are a super source of omega-3 fatty acids, an essential acid to help reduce the risk of heart disease. The anti-inflammatory nutrients in walnuts also help support bone health, and lower the risk of chronic inflammation and stress.

But that’s not all folks! 90% of the phenols in walnuts are found in the skin, including key phenolic acids, tannins and flavonoids. They’re also proven to support brain function and help your memory (they even resemble a human’s brain!).

Per 30 g (approx. 9 walnuts): 220 calories, 22 g fat (0 g sat fat), 0 mg sodium, 5 g carbohydrates, 1 g of sugar, 2 g fibre, 5 g protein, 11% RDI magnesium.

Pistachios

You may have broken a nail (or two) trying to open these little green gems, but we all know they’re worth it! Pistachios are high in nutritional and antioxidant value - as we grow older, our cells grow older too and are more susceptible to damage due to the presence of free radicals. The antioxidants found in pistachios can actually sweep up these free radicals and reverse some of the cellular damage.

Pistachios are also high in vitamin B6, an essential B vitamin to improve heart and brain health. Women need 1.5 mg of vitamin B6 per day, and a 30 g serving of pistachios contain 0.4 mg, helping you reach your RDI of this beneficial B vitamin. Bonus: they’re the nut with the highest concentration of lutein and zeaxanthin, both of which promote eye health!

Per 30 g (approx. 30 pistachios): 156 calories, 12.5 g fat (2 g sat fat), 8 g carbohydrates, 3 g fibre, 6 g protein.

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